Cfare mendoni per kete?

Albanian-Americans celebrate Albanian’s independence

 

It was 97 years ago when Luigj Guarkuqi, Dom Nikoll Kacorri and Ismail Qemali gathered in the city of Vlore, raised the Albanian flag, and declared Albania independent from the Ottoman Empire. And today, November 28, hundreds of Albanian-Americans celebrated Albanian’s independence in the Belmont Section of the Bronx and then moved up to the Our Lady of Shkoder Church, in Hartsdale, NY, where both Albanian Catholics and Muslims joined in the ceremony of raising the Albanian flag in the front of the church, which by now has become an annual tradition of the Albanian church.

Father Peter Popaj, the administrator of the Church offered Mass in the Albanian language and asked the churchgoers to pray for the souls of those Albanians’ who fought and died to make sure that Albania became independent. “If it were not for those brave Albanians who were willing to fight and die for Albania, we would not have a free and independent Albania” said Popaj during the Mass.

Mark Gjonaj, the co-founder of the Albanian-American Community Association and the organizer of this historical event made sure that the streets of the Bronx were decorated with both Albania and American flags.

“Today, we are all Albanians” said James Vacca, New York City Councilman, and a vivid supporter of both the Albanian and Kosovar communities of the Bronx. Mr. Vacca’s organized the firs independence day in the City Hall commemorating the first anniversary of Kosovo’s independence, and was instrumental in naming part of Lydig Avenue in the Bronx after Mather Theresa

In the 1500s, Albania came under the rule of the Ottoman Empire (centered in what is now Turkey), and did not gain its independence until 1912. From 1944 to 1990, Albania was a Communist state, ruled by Enver Hoxha, a Muslim dictator, who prohibited the mentioning of the names of the real architects of Albanian’s independence, Luigj Gurakuqi and Dom Nikoll Kacorri, because they were both Roman Catholics from the Northern Albania city of Shkoder, which Hoxha hated passionately. Kocorri and Gurakuqi wrote the Declaration of Independence in the Albanian language as the rest of the group could not write or read Albania.

Though today, their contribution to Albania’s independence if acknowledged by Albanian’s government, the Monument of Independence in Vlora, which was erected during the communist rule, still is a misrepresentation as neither Gurakuqi nor Kacorri are depicted in this Monument.

Nga:

Pjerin Lumaj

Pjerin Lumaj, Esq., is a Civil Rights Attorney in New York City. After obtaining his BA in Political Science from CUNY in 1996 and his LL.B from the University of Wolverhampton in 2005, he earned his Master of Laws (LL.M) from Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. He has been admitted to the Washington D.C. Court of Appeals. Email Peter.

4 Komente

Por c'ti mendosh mor lal, te futesh ne mendime per kete shkrim , me mire tja japesh vetes baam.

zotrules car ke shkrujt mer yaho se nuk kuptova azgje!! shqip shqip.

Shqiptaro-amerikanet pra... u ka mbetur nje cike ora tek komunizmi.

From 1944 to 1990, Albania was a Communist state, ruled by Enver Hoxha, a Muslim dictator, who prohibited the mentioning of the names of the real architects of Albanian’s independence, Luigj Gurakuqi and Dom Nikoll Kacorri, because they were both Roman Catholics from the Northern Albania city of Shkoder, which Hoxha hated passionately. Kocorri and Gurakuqi wrote the Declaration of Independence in the Albanian language as the rest of the group could not write or read Albania.

ore, une historine ne kohen e Enverit e kam mesuar, por keta dy emra, e sidomos Gurakuqi nuk mbaj mend te jene fshire apo denigruar asokohe. Pastaj, Hoxha nuk e kishte inatin vetem me katoliket, ai i fshiu te gjithe kundershtaret e vet, pa dallim feje, krahine e ideje.

 

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